spinach quiche with sweet-potato crust

Don’t you just love when you can make a breakfast meal that doubles as dinner? Two birds, one stone. Best thing ever. And this quiche is exactly that. Save, no birds die. Speaking figuratively is hard.
This quiche boasts a tiny bit of spice, courtesy of the salsa, but it’s mellowed by the eggs and spinach, transforming it into a savory dish more than heated one. The ‘crust,’ such as it is, can be either crispy or soft —a similar consistency as the filling, depending on how long you bake it before adding the filling. It’s your choice. Breakfast? Dinner? Crispy? Soft? Whatevs. It’s all delicious. Enjoy!

SPINACH QUICHE WITH SWEET-POTATO CRUST

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Crust:
2 sweet potatoes, baked
1 egg
½ teaspoon salt

Quiche Filling:
8 eggs
1/2 cup water
½ pint jar of salsa, strained and liquid drained away
2 cups organic greens like spinach/arugula/kale/spring greens
salt and pepper to taste
½ teaspoon poultry seasoning

Crust:
Scrub 2 sweet potatoes and pierce skin with a sharp knife, allowing them to breathe while baking (so much better than exploding inside your oven). Place potatoes directly on the rack of a 400-degree preheated oven and bake for 40-45 minutes. Make sure the burner is lined with foil as the potatoes will drip while baking.

Slice baked and cooled potatoes lengthwise down the middle. Scoop potato into a mixing bowl and discard the skin. Add one egg and salt. Mix using a hand-mixer and then spread into the bottom of a greased baking dish or pie plate.

Bake in a 400 degree oven for 10 minutes or until spongy. Add a few minutes if you prefer a more crispy crust. Set aside while you mix up the filling.

Quiche filling:
In a large mixing bowl combine eggs, water, strained salsa, salt, pepper, and seasoning. Mix with a hand mixer until well incorporated. Add in greens and mix again on low. Pour contents over baked sweet potato crust.

Bake in a 375 degree oven for 35-40 minutes or until egg is baked through and lightly browned on top.

Note: This recipe makes enough crust and quiche for two 9” pie plates. Freeze one if you like!

crispy brussels sprouts with a soft egg

I have this distinct memory of my first brussels sprout experience.
I could wax poetic about texture (there was a lot) and flavor (it was bad), color (definitely bland and kind of . . . wilted), but I’ll be brief and just say that my brussels sprout sensibilities have matured as I’ve aged. I’ve also learned how to cook them a bit differently than whoever cooked them for me that first time. So, in addition to culinary maturity, the actual vegetable dish itself has improved.
It’s all good. In fact, it’s quite good. Brussels sprouts are actually one of my all time favorite vegetables.

Hear that younger self? If time travel is a thing I hope you Google yourself, find this post, and read these words: YOU WILL LIKE BRUSSLES SPROUTS.

Awesome. Now if the time-space continuum breaks you’ll know it’s my fault.
That’s the power of a properly cooked vegetable. And it’s even more powerful when topped with a soft egg.
Enjoy!

CRISPY BRUSSELS SPROUTS WITH A SOFT EGG

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1 lb brussles sprouts
3 + tablespoons clarified butter
Salt and pepper to taste
4 eggs

Begin by washing the brussels sprouts in a colander under cold water. Then slice the edge of the bottom stem off, removing the first layer of leaves. Pull these away and then slice the sprout in half. Do this with each sprout. It’s a little tedious, but totally worth it.

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Once all of your sprouts are cleaned, heat the butter in a large flat-bottom pan over med-high heat. If you are so inclined, feel free to add more butter. Because butter.
Toss the cleaned sprouts in the pan and turn with a spatula to coat evenly. Salt and pepper generously, cover, and let the heat do its magic. Leave them sit for 3 minutes or so, and then turn again. Leave for another three minutes and turn. The goal here is to allow the heat to soften the sprouts while gently crisping the outer edges. You are going for a browned-almost-brunt edge on the majority of the sprouts without overcooking or over-softening them. Mushy sprouts are gross. No amount of butter can fix them.

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When the edges are browned, remove the sprouts from the pan, turn down the heat a bit and cook the eggs.  Crack the shells gently so as not to break the yokes and sprinkle with salt and pepper. Cover the pan and allow the eggs to cook just a couple of minutes—until the yellow yoke is covered with a very think film of white.

Plate the brussels sprouts evenly between four plates, and using a soft spatula, gently top each pile of sprouts with a soft egg.

*makes four servings

Salmon and dill omelet

Okay. Favorite food combinations: Go.
Chocolate and peanut butter . . .
Carmel and apples . . .
Yogurt and strawberry jam . . .
Coffee and cream . . .
French fries and vinegar  . . .
salmon and dill . . .
Wine and everything . . .

Yes. Wine and EVERYTHING.
But we can pretend that one didn’t make quite such a strong appearance on the list and back up to the item before it.
Salmon and dill. I get kind of drooly just thinking about this.
And I made it for breakfast-lunch . . . brunch . . . today. So my love is REAL.

Omelet: Salmon, dill, wilted spinach, garlic, caramelized peppers. *dies*
Sundays were made for this kind of food, and if you have more than your own little tribe to feed, it’s one of those dishes that’s a quick route to wow. So, think company/visiting guests/in-laws if you need a go-to breakfast plan. I’ve made this before with cream cheese, and it was amazeballs. But it’s even better with homemade mayo!
WHAT?! 
Yes. I know.

SALMON AND DILL OMELET

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1 sweet pepper (yellow, orange, or red)
1 can of salmon in water (or a fresh fillet baked/grilled/smoked/etc if you have it!)
1 small handful of spinach
1 teaspoon diced garlic
1/2 teaspoon of dill
3 eggs
1/4 cup mayo
1/2 cup of coconut milk
pepper and salt to taste
1 Tablespoon butter

In a small sauté pan, melt 1/2 tablespoon of butter and sauté garlic and diced peppers until the peppers start to brown and caramelize around the edges. Add drained salmon, spinach, dill, and mayo. Lower heat, mix to combine, and cover.
In a large sauté pan, melt 1/2 tablespoon of butter. Mix eggs, coconut milk, salt and pepper in a mixing bowl until frothy. Test the pan to make sure it’s hot and then pour egg mixture into the pan, lifting it off the burner and coating the sides of the pan with the mixture repeatedly. In this way the egg cooks up the sides and distributes evenly. As it cooks, continue lifting and coating the sides until there is no more runny egg and the edges begin to brown and lift away from the pan. The egg will still be shiny and wet in the bottom. Add the salmon mixture to the pan on only one side. Imagine drawing a line down the middle of the pan. Spread the salmon mixture evenly on only one side—like a half-moon—and then with a rubber spatula, turn over the empty half of the omelet until it covers the full half. Like the top and bottom of a sandwich. Gently slide onto a plate and serve with a side of fruit.

Makes 2 omelets

Spiral skillet apples

Kitchen gadgets are like shoes. The more you have the more you need because you just never know when you might need that avocado cutter or counter-top garlic chopper! For real.
However. There are a few kitchen gadgets/appliances I’ve found it impossible to live without—especially as I am cooking for six people—breakfast, lunch, and dinner. And several of my tribe have food/eating issues. (See my previous post).

My food processor has been a Godsend in this regard, and lately I find myself using it almost everyday. It’s a hard worker and it covers everything from taking care of onions so I don’t have to cry (more than necessary) over the dinner-making process, to baby-food puree, sauces and dips, and even shredding meat for sandwiches! I love that thing.
But yesterday something arrived in the mail that may rival my love—at least in the veggie department.
You guys.
This. Thing.
Boom.

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I refer to it as my food processor’s pretty little sister.
Is that mean?
I don’t even know.
Anyway.

Now, I have a big kitchen and room for a few extras, the unnecessary luxury of a spiral vegetable slicer being one such thing. I’m a kitchen gadget nerd. That said, if you are trying to incorporate more veggies (or fruits!) into your diet, or your kids’ diets, this may be quite useful. I made zucchini noodles topped with a fried egg for lunch yesterday and my third-born ate it all. Now, she is normally a great eater (my one and only) but even that was stretching it for her. And yet the novelty of the noodles won over her sweet but occasionally-stubborn toddler heart.
And me? Well, I’m sold. In fact, here’s breakfast this morning:

SPIRAL SKILLET APPLES

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1 apple, (spiralized on the smallest-noodle setting)
1 small onion (also spiralized on the smallest-noodle setting)
1/4 c of finely-diced dried fruit (figs/prunes/appricots/rasins/craisins/etc)
1 Tablespoon clarified butter
Sprinkling of cinnamon to taste
In a medium-hot skillet, sauté dried fruit in butter until soft. Add the onions and sauté until they begin to soften and then the apple spirals.  Sprinkle with cinnamon. Cover the skillet and bake until the apple is soft—no more than a couple minutes. Serve hot.

• Note: If you choose to forgo the spirals and just slice your apple, then follow all the same steps above. But dice the onions, and when you add the sliced apples, let them bake a few minutes longer in the covered skillet.